Da Grunt's Support Team!

By: A Jarheads Dad

[Recommend this Fotopage] | [Share this Fotopage]
[<<  <  1  2  3  4  5  6  [7]  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  >  >>]    [Archive]
Tuesday, 31-Jan-2006 18:49 Email | Share | | Bookmark
Rolling tribute to LCpl Patrick Kenny!

LCpl Patrick Kenny Bumper Sticker!
Tricia, Chuck, and Molly Kenny at ARL Trucking ceremony!
http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/06031/646973.stm

Trucking company will honor fallen Marine
Vehicles will bear decal of Emsworth soldier
Tuesday, January 31, 2006

By Milan Simonich, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Rolling memorials to Marine Lance Cpl. Patrick Kenny will touch just about every U.S. highway.
American Road Line, a trucking company based in Moon, announced yesterday that it is placing decals of Cpl. Kenny on its 550 semi tractor-trailers, which haul goods to and from most major cities.

Cpl. Kenny, 20, of Emsworth, died Oct. 6 in a roadside bombing near Al Karmah, Iraq. Three other Marines were killed in the attack.

Ron Faherty, president of American Road Line, said Cpl. Kenny's short life and death in service to his country should not be forgotten. After talking with his sister, Cindy Lioi, who knows the Kenny family, Mr. Faherty proposed using his fleet for an ongoing tribute. The Kennys agreed.

"We'll never forget our son. But we're so humbled that others wanted to make sure he is remembered," Cpl. Kenny's mother, Tricia, said after a ceremony unveiling the decal, about the size of a car window.

It shows Cpl. Kenny in combat gear and carries a simple heading -- "Some Gave All."

Molly Kenny, 22, one of his three sisters, wept as the decal was made public. But she said she felt happy because the decals on wheels will help keep his memory alive.

"I'm overwhelmed. My worst fear was that people would forget about him," she said.


Mr. Faherty had the same concern. He said reports of a handful of war casualties each day can be numbing, causing the public to see the fallen servicemen as statistics instead of sons and daughters, brothers and sisters.
Relatives said Cpl. Kenny's ambition from boyhood was to serve in the military. So gung ho was Cpl. Kenny that he inspired his younger sister, Katy, to follow him into the Marine Corps.

She completed boot camp about two weeks before he was killed. Katy Kenny now is a private stationed at Fort Leonard Wood, Mo.

In addition to American Road Line's fleet, Emsworth's five fire trucks will carry the decal of Cpl. Kenny. He lived across the street from the firehouse.

Bumper stickers depicting Cpl. Kenny also are available for purchase through American Road Line and the Emsworth Volunteer Fire Department. All proceeds will go to the Injured Marine Semper Fi Fund.

Cpl. Kenny's father, Chuck, said helping injured Marines is a cause his son would have embraced.

Mr. Kenny said people usually want to talk about the politics of the war in Iraq, but he refuses to discuss that topic.

"The question I get most is 'What do you think of us being over there?' I say it doesn't matter. We're there and our young men and women aren't coming home until it's over."

To order a bumper sticker of Cpl. Kenny by e-mail, write cindy@1stoutspecialty.com. The cost is $5 each or three for $10.



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

(Milan Simonich can be reached at msimonich@post-gazette.com or 412-263-1956.)

Robin Rombach, Post-Gazette
Tricia Kenny, Chuck Kenny and their daughter Molly Kenny, listen to speakers during a ceremony honoring their son, Lance Cpl. Patrick Kenny, who was killed in Iraq last year. The ceremony was held at ARL trucking company in Moon. The company is placing decals with Kenny's picture on 550 of its vehicles.


Monday, 30-Jan-2006 22:05 Email | Share | | Bookmark
Warlords receive awards!

Warlords form up for award ceremony!
LCpl Matthew Crowe receives Purple Heart!
http://www.marines.mil/marinelink/mcn2000.nsf/lookupstoryref/2006127105842

2nd Marines leathernecks recognized for sacrifice, valor
Submitted by: 2nd Marine Division
Story Identification #: 2006127105842
Story by Cpl. Mike Escobar

MARINE CORPS BASE CAMP LEJEUNE, N.C. (Jan. 25, 2006) -- In 1943, the 2nd Marine Regiment spearheaded the battle to take the Japanese-held Tarawa atoll, a series of islets in the central Pacific, as U.S. forces pressed toward the Land of the Rising Sun. The Corps lost more than 1,100 men as they were cut down by Japanese machine gunners on the shores and beaches, while of the 4,700 Japanese defenders, only 17 survived.

Sixty-three years later, the regiment’s reputation for courage and tenacity under fire continues in the desert and urban battlefields of Iraq, embodied in the fighting spirit of the Marines and sailors who risk their lives everyday fighting in the Global War on Terrorism.

On Jan. 25, eight such warriors with the 2nd Marine Regiment received Purple Heart Medals here Jan. 25 for wounds suffered during combat operations in Iraq throughout the past year. Another was awarded a Navy Achievement Medal with combat distinguishing device.

Presenting the Marines their awards was Col. George P. Garrett, 2nd Marine Division’s chief of staff.

“I want to thank you all on behalf of the commanding general for putting it all on the line,” Garrett said to the assembled Marines after the awards presentation. “We’ve treasured the sacrifices you all have put forth.”

For Marines like Lance Cpl. Matthew Crowe, a squad automatic weapon gunner with 2nd Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment and one of the Purple Heart recipients, the fight for freedom abroad came at no light cost.

The 19-year-old Ligonier, Penn. native was serving as a vehicle gunner aboard a re-supply convoy Dec. 1, 2005 when his near brush with death occurred. His unit had been operating in Karmah, a city located near Fallujah, Iraq.

“The convoy was hit by an IED (improvised explosive device) while we were coming back, and shrapnel blew through the humvee, hitting me three times in the left leg,” Crowe explained. “Two of the pieces went through and broke my fibula, and I was knocked out from the blast.”

“I woke up, and I saw my leg all mangled up and bleeding,” he continued. “It just felt like we’d been hit out of nowhere.”
Crowe received what medical care he could in Iraq before being rushed back to the U.S. for further treatment.

“I couldn’t walk for the first month,” said Crowe, a 2004 graduate of Ligonier Valley High School who played quarterback for his football team. “It really sucked for that first month, because I was used to being active and running a lot.”

Crowe currently continues to recover from his wounds, and looks forward to continuing his career in the military.

“I think everything will go back to normal,” he stated. “This really hasn’t changed anything. I still have a lot of pride in being a Marine.”

To senior commanders like Garrett, this can-do attitude has and always will be the hallmark of every Marine. The Corps stands resolute to continue the fight on terrorism abroad, he said.

“This generation has stood up to the hardest test the Marine Corps has ever had,” Garrett stated. “It’s something that the whole country is extremely proud of.”



MARINE CORPS BASE CAMP LEJEUNE, N.C. – Marines with the 2nd Marine Regiment stand at attention as Col. George P. Garrett, 2nd Marine Division’s chief of staff, presents them their Purple Heart Medals here Jan. 25. Eight of the regiment’s Marines were awarded these medals for injuries suffered during a recent deployment to Iraq, while another leatherneck was presented a Navy Achievement Medal with combat distinguishing device for displaying courage under enemy fire. Photo by: Cpl. Athanasios Genos

MARINE CORPS BASE CAMP LEJEUNE, N.C. – Lance Cpl. Matthew Crowe, an infantryman with 2nd Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment, is presented his Purple Heart Medal here Jan. 25. The 19-year-old Ligonier, Penn. native broke his let fibula Dec. 1, 2005 when an improvised explosive device detonated near his convoy in Karmah, Iraq, and peppered his leg with shrapnel.
Photo by: Cpl. Athanasios Genos


Monday, 30-Jan-2006 01:38 Email | Share | | Bookmark
Karmah, Iraq OIF4!

And you want me to wear side armor too?
OK, didn't get this Grunt's name. Help me out!
Just a walk in the park!
View all 8 photos...
Just some random pics. Patrolling with IA 1-4-1. The first stand alone Iraqi BN in theater!


Tuesday, 24-Jan-2006 12:00 Email | Share | | Bookmark
Sgt Sean H. Miles

 
Sean died doing what he said he would do, "Bring his Marines home!". God Bless Him! Fair Winds Sgt!

There is an excellent slideshow of Sean on the link in the first story below. - JHD


Marine Came From Military Tradition
Sergeant's family proud of their Marine
BY MEREDITH BONNY
TIMES-DISPATCH STAFF WRITER
Friday, January 27, 2006

Sean Miles knew every Star Wars movie by heart.
In high school, he hated homework and relished football. As a fullback at Clover Hill High in Chesterfield County, Miles dreamed of becoming a professional football player.

He loved the Redskins, but he lived the Marines.

A black-belt, martial-arts instructor, the 28-year-old Marine Corps sergeant couldn't sit through an episode of "Cops" if children were involved in the plot.

He vowed his son, 2½ year-old Tyler, would grow up strong.

This week, Miles died proving what strength means.

Fewer than two weeks before he was due to wind up a seven-month tour of duty in Iraq, Miles was killed in action Tuesday in the Iraqi town of Karmah, about 50 miles west of Baghdad.

"He lived and breathed being a U.S. Marine platoon sergeant, and he died pulling a fellow Marine to safety," said Michael Miles, Sean's father.

Yesterday, Miles' parents, who live in Chesterfield's Woodlake subdivision, spent the day at Camp Lejeune, N.C., with Miles' widow, Genevieve, and their grandson.

They shared stories about their son.

"He was a tough guy on the outside but such a softie on the inside," Miles' mother, Debbie Miles, said with a laugh. "I never thought Sean would be ready for fatherhood, but he grabbed the bull by the horns."

"Tyler was the love of his life. He was his daddy's little boy," she said. "We will make sure he knows everything he needs to know about his father, even the silly things."

Miles, who came from a family with a military tradition, was assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division. He died as a result of small-arms fire, a Department of Defense news release said.

Miles joined the Marines in October 1996, the year he graduated from high school. Before deploying to Iraq, he did two tours in the Pacific Rim, following in the footsteps of an uncle, Regi Miles, a Marine gunnery sergeant who died in 1988 during a training exercise in Okinawa.

Sean Miles named his son, Tyler Regi Miles, after him.

"He looked up [to his uncle] all the time," said Henry A. Miles Jr., Miles' grandfather and a World War II Navy veteran who served with the Seabees in Okinawa.

"For us it's like it's happening all over again," the grandfather said.

Sean Miles was born in Long Island, grew up in Virginia and was stationed at Camp Lejeune. He will be buried in San Antonio, his wife's hometown.

"We want him to be with her and his son," Debbie Miles said, adding that a memorial service would be held in the Richmond area next week.

Miles, a middle child, moved to Chesterfield in 1990. He attended Swift Creek Middle School and graduated from Clover Hill.

"He wanted to play football more than anything in the world," his mother said, adding that on the gridiron her son had more heart than skill.

"He was decent," she said, chuckling.

Ted Salmon was Miles' varsity football coach.

At 168 pounds, "he was not big . . . but he was an outstanding young man who played with a lot of heart," Salmon said. "He was the kind of player you really enjoyed having. He played with a lot of desire."

Erin Miles, Sean's sister, got emotional yesterday when she talked about her older brother.

The two were born just more than a year apart and looked alike.

"We grew up so identical," she said. "I always tagged along with all of his buddies. He always looked out for me."

She laughed as she recalled how her brother would sniff out the Christmas presents and torment her with the details.

"He would say: 'I found Mom's hiding spot. Do you want to know what you got?'"

But just minutes after laughing, Erin Miles started to cry.

She was going to miss him, she said.

More importantly, she wanted people to know just how good her brother was and how proud she was of him.

"There was nothing about him that was not a Marine," she said. "I want people to know that.

"I want them to know what an outstanding Marine he was. With all this anti-war talk, I want them to know how proud we are of his service. There will never come a day that we will regret it."


Contact staff writer Meredith Bonny at mbonny@timesdispatch.com or (804) 649-6452.
Staff writer Holly Prestidge contributed to this report.

This story can be found at: http://www.timesdispatch.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=RTD/MGArticle/RTD_BasicArticle&c=MGArticle&cid=1137833681372



http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/01/25/AR2006012502613.html


Va. Marine Dies 3 Weeks Before Iraq Tour Was to End

By Allan Lengel
Washington Post Staff Writer
Thursday, January 26, 2006; B03



Sgt. Sean Miles was a tough Marine with a soft heart.

Last summer, just before shoving off for Iraq, Miles phoned his older brother back home in Virginia and asked him to "keep an eye" on his 2 1/2 -year old son, Tyler, in case the unthinkable happened.

"I didn't want to talk about it," said Christopher Miles of Midlothian, where the family had moved in 1990 from New York. "I felt talking about it would jinx it, but it was something he wanted to talk about."

On Tuesday, the unthinkable happened.

Sean Miles, 28, was killed by small-arms fire while conducting combat operations in Karmah, Iraq, just three weeks before he was scheduled to complete his seven-month tour.

He was assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, 2nd Marine Expeditionary Force, based at Camp Lejeune, N.C. Among his decorations were the Navy and Marine Corps Achievement Medal and the Combat Action Ribbon.

Yesterday, family and friends gathered at his home in North Carolina, where his wife, Genevieve, and son had been anxiously awaiting his return. The family chose brother Christopher, 30, the oldest of three siblings, to speak about Sean.

"He was one of those people everyone seemed to know," Miles said. "We keep having people come up to us and say they knew him or say they went to school with him. I can't imagine the number of friends he had. I'm the introvert of the two of us. I'm envious of the lives he touched."

Miles said his brother loved sports and excelled in varsity football at Clover Hill High School in Midlothian, west of Richmond.

"He was the jock of the family," Miles said. "He loved to live and relive those glory days."

After a game, if he had made any outstanding plays, he liked to watch the video. Sometimes, he watched the videos "years after the fact," Miles said.

In 1996, as graduation approached, his brother was set on joining the Marines.

"I think he didn't consider anything else but the military," said Miles, who served in the Navy.

"When he put on the uniform, he was 100 percent Marine," Miles said. "He was the poster child for the Marine Corps. He lived and breathed the Marine Corps. He had such pride in wearing the uniform."

Miles said his brother trained Marines at Camp Lejeune before heading to Iraq. He felt the need to go there.

"He wanted to be able to say he'd been there and served," Miles said.

This month, Sean Miles belatedly received a Christmas package from home filled with goodies and gifts, including videos of Redskin football games his father had taped.

"His big concern was the Redskins," Miles said.

Yesterday, in the face of loss, Miles said that "as upset as we are," the family does not regret Sean Miles's service.

"He believed in what we were there for," his brother said.



Sunday, 22-Jan-2006 12:00 Email | Share | | Bookmark
Advance returns and Da Grunt comes home!

The crowd waits!
OK, we're ready now!
Where's the %&*^ bus?
View all 11 photos...
It was a grand Homecoming last weekend. Small but glorious nonetheless! I'd like to take a minute and thank Golf CO's lovely wife, Lisa, for doing such a great job keeping us informed and coming out to meet the bus on such a blustery evening! There were only a small few Golf Marines and we sincerely thank you for helping make the Homecoming even more enjoyable!

Won't be long now 'til the Main Body hits the deck onboard CL!


[<<  <  1  2  3  4  5  6  [7]  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  >  >>]    [Archive]

© Pidgin Technologies Ltd. 2016

ns4008464.ip-198-27-69.net